July, 2017

 

Soho Rep Will Return to Its Longtime Theater With Two N…

ANDREW R. CHOW Photo Soho Rep will return to its longtime home with a new season that includes new work by Jackie Sibblies Drury. Credit Piotr Redlinski for The New York Times After a period of uncertainty and turmoil, Soho Rep will return to its longtime home with a new season that includes new works from Aleshea Harris and Jackie Sibblies Drury. In September, the company abruptly closed its longtime theater at 46 Walker Street because of previously unknown building restrictions that interfered with a production. However, officials at CityRead More


Boy

VIKKI VARGAS With some help from an Oregon-based nonprofit, a 10-year-old boy with Spina Bifida was transformed into the Flash for this year’s Comic-Con in San Diego. His wheelchair was decked out with huge blinking lightning bolts and splashing waves to show his speed. The boy, Kumaka Jensen, is an extreme sports fanatic who can do tricks and backflips with his wheelchair that would put Tony Hawk to shame. This year, he wanted to go to Comic-Con not as a boy in a wheelchair, but as a superhero capable of runningRead More


When It Came to Style, Sam Shepard Was an Endangered Sp…

JIM WINDOLF In the 1960s he had long hair when he was busing tables at the Village Gate, playing drums with the Holy Modal Rounders and writing the experimental, Samuel Beckett-influenced plays that would make his name, but somehow his appearance did not suggest hippie. He had, instead, the look of a man who had ridden into town. He might stay the night. Then again he might not. Continue reading the main story Across his long and accidental-seeming career he made alliances — through romance, friendship, work — with othersRead More


An Encore for the Native Americans Who Shook Up Rock ’n…

ROBERT ITO For every Redbone, the ’70s rockers who openly embraced their Indian roots, there were dozens of others who did not. For many, there was little upside to it. “Around the time when ‘Rumble’ came out, there was the Hayes Pond incident, where this Grand Dragon was preaching from the backs of trucks about the ‘mongrelization’ of white people by American Indians,” Ms. Bainbridge said, referring to a North Carolina confrontation between the Klan and the Lumbee. “Link Wray grew up in the center of all that, as didRead More


Will Shark Lovers Love ‘Unabomber’? Asking for a Cable …

NEIL GENZLINGER “Manhunt: Unabomber” might seem an incongruity in a schedule anchored with shows like “Naked and Afraid” and “Deadliest Catch.” But not to John Goldwyn, a producer who had worked with Mr. Ross on the Fox series “Gracepoint” and on another good fact-based series for Discovery, “Harley and the Davidsons.” Photo A great white shark observed by a researcher in an episode of “Shark Week” in 2015. Credit Discovery Channel The network, he said, has always liked American history, and it has always liked aspirational stories in which aRead More


Sam Shepard, Pulitzer-Winning Playwright and Actor, Is …

SOPAN DEB Sam Shepard, the celebrated avant-garde playwright and Oscar-nominated actor, died on Thursday at his home in Kentucky. He was 73. A spokesman for the Shepard family said the cause was complications of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease. One of the most important and influential early writers in the Off Broadway movement, Mr. Shepard captured and chronicled the darker sides of American family life in plays like “Buried Child,” which won the Pulitzer Prize for drama in 1979, and “Curse of the Starving Class” and “A LieRead More


Actor, Playwright Sam Shepard Dies at 73

Sam Shepard, the Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, Oscar-nominated actor and celebrated author whose plays chronicled the explosive fault lines of family and masculinity in the American West, has died. He was 73. Family spokesman Chris Boneau said Monday that Shepard died Thursday at his home in Kentucky from complications related to Lou Gehrig’s disease, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The taciturn Shepard, who grew up on a California ranch, was a man of few words who nevertheless produced 44 plays and numerous books, memoirs and short stories. He was one of theRead More


Critics for The New York Times on Sam Shepard’s Plays, …

JOSHUA BARONE Critics for The New York Times on Sam Shepard’s Plays, Books and Movies – The New York Times Plays Sam Shepard does not merely denounce chaos and anomie in American life, he mourns over them. His corrosive images and scenes of absurdity never soften to concede the presence of a lament, but it is there all the same. Denunciation that has no pity in it is pamphleteering at best and a striking of fashionable attitudes at worst, and it is fairly common on the contemporary stage. Mr. ShepardRead More


2 Chainz’s Style? It’s More Like 7 Chains

BEE SHAPIRO Photo “I sleep in like three or four chains,” the rapper 2 Chainz says. “I get up and add two to three more.” Credit Nathan Bajar for The New York Times The rapper 2 Chainz (born Tauheed Epps) loves jewelry so much that he usually wears more than two chains at a time, even when he sleeps. This month and next, he’ll be traveling the country on his “Pretty Girls Like Trap Music” tour. He also hosts a GQ video series focused on his love for luxury goods.Read More


What’s on TV Monday: ‘What Maisie Knew’ and ‘The Bachel…

KATHRYN SHATTUCK Photo Julianne Moore, left, and Onata Aprile in “What Maisie Knew.” Credit Jojo Whilden/Millennium Entertainment Rock on with Julianne Moore and Tilda Swinton as superstars wreaking havoc on their loved ones. Or hear what the men have to say about Rachel’s behavior during her love quest. What’s Streaming WHAT MAISIE KNEW (2013) on Amazon. A divorcing Manhattan couple — Susanna (Julianne Moore), a rock musician, and Beale (Steve Coogan), an art dealer — turn into monster parents when their daughter, Maisie (Onata Aprile), becomes a pawn in theirRead More